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Wed, Nov. 30th, 2005, 08:36 pm
drdirt: Hi community

I have been a soil scientist for 20 years. Most people jump from geology straight to the surface without considering the soil resource in planning. I would be glad to supply information on this resource whenever it is needed. I rant and rave on my journal about origins of the earth. It is my hobby.

If I can ever be of any assistance on issues related to soil, just ask.

Thu, Dec. 1st, 2005 02:46 am (UTC)
morningmorgan

DO you know of any job openings for soil scientists? I graduate in December and am looking. I have 3 months field experience and lab experience as well as am on the USU soil judging team.

Thu, Dec. 1st, 2005 04:02 pm (UTC)
(Anonymous): jobs

All I can tell you i to go to the usajobs site at the link below and search the 0470 series. THis will give you a list of all open soil science jobs in the government. There are no openings in my state right now. If I here of one I will let you know.

http://jobsearch.usajobs.opm.gov/

Thu, Dec. 1st, 2005 04:02 pm (UTC)
drdirt: jobs

All I can tell you i to go to the usajobs site at the link below and search the 0470 series. THis will give you a list of all open soil science jobs in the government. There are no openings in my state right now. If I here of one I will let you know.

http://jobsearch.usajobs.opm.gov/

Fri, Dec. 2nd, 2005 04:34 am (UTC)
swot_analysis

hm....i've never thought about soild effecting development. can you tell me more ) whilst trying to keep the terms as simple as possible) i'm a planning student.
thanks

Fri, Dec. 2nd, 2005 01:42 pm (UTC)
drdirt

I'll try. I am a resource soil scientist now. That means I do onsite investigations to help people with soil characteristics that might affect the land use they have in mind such as a pond, road, building etc.

Their are characteristics such as low strength-caused by high silt content, shrink-swell-caused by high clay content, seepage-caused by high sand content. Runoff and drainage issues should always be considered when planning a development. A developer or planner should consider where a raindrop is going to go when it hits their development. Will the soils allow it to infiltrate, or will it runoff. If it runs off how fast will it go. When it runs downslope will it hit the foundation of a building. If this causes excess wetness at the footing of a building will it risk the structural integrity. If it hits the roof, where will it go from there. Will it runoff and drip along the edge? Will it go down a gutter and then sit next to the footing? Will it come out of the gutter and run to a low spot and cause ponding or wetness on the neighbor?

THere are a lot of issues related to the soil and natural resources that can affect structure integrity and even economics of a project. THe proper time to deal with them is in the planning stage. As a planner, if you take care of issues like the above and apply those costs and practices at the beginning, you will have a fantastic reputation as a successful planner.

I hope this sheds some light. It may be to simple. If this sparks any further questions, just ask.